Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Persil has Arrived in America (and it's driving me nuts)

It always excites me when something from home arrives in American shops.  (Apparently it doesn't take much to get me excited)

Just recently there's been a new advert on the telly for Persil ProClean and it's driving me bloody mad.  Every time I hear it, I cringe and get a little bit mad.  Why, you ask?  Well just take a look at this ....



Did you hear it?  Do you see what I mean?  No, then take another listen.  The way they pronounce Persil as Pu-SEEL drives me nuts.  I know, its only a little thing, but even so.  PER-SIL, it's Per-sil. Arghhh.  (and don't even get me started on the pronunciation of Adidas).

I wish someone at Persil would tell them how to say it, after all they've been making washing powder for over 100 years, so someone there should know, shouldn't they?

I was going to try and find the English version of the advert, but I found this instead and it's just so lovely - 100 Years of Persil, What is a Mum?


Is that little Ron Weasley in the go kart?  I think the skinhead one was one of my favourite adverts growing up.

I honestly don't think the American pronunciation is going to change so I will have to make do muting the telly or just shouting "IT'S PER-SIL!!" at the screen every time I see the advert.

Is there any American pronunciation that get's your blood boiling?  Do tell...

11 comments:

  1. This is a bit obscure... They call a car with a soft top a "coop", instead of a "coup-ay" (not sure I can get the e acute accent here, but the word I'm talking about is "coupe"). I know that's really obscure, but I worked in a toy shop, and we sold a toy coup-ay. But it didn't get my blood boiling. It got me inwardly chuckling.

    On the theme of cars, how about "vee-hickle" as a pronounciation?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I never liked bay-sil (weirdly similar to per-sil, if you think about it), or orreganno. And I wish they'd put the "h" on the front of "erbs".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right there with you on all of it.. :-)

      Delete
  3. Agreed, agreed, agreed. Come on Unilever - get the name right! But then again, what do you expect in a country where they have cordon BLUE cooks. Have some sympathy folks - have you heard Americans talk about Worcestershire sauce? But I would add a word of caution - we Brits should be careful about pointing our linguistic fingers! Is it Newcassel or Newcarsel, scon or scoan and why do we say Paris and not Paree. Americans pronounce buoy as booee when we say boy (but 200 years ago it was pronounced booee in England). This is a different country - a VERY different country. Have a nice day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, yes.. the old War-Sester-Shyre sauce!! :-)

      Delete
  4. I agree that is PER-SIL, not per-SIL. So irritating! Another one that bugs me is Van Gogh: "Van Go " instead of "Van Goff".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha.. and what about Bur-naRRd.... instead of Ber-Nad.... this could go on forever lol

      Delete
  5. My god, doncha know it's Van HOG?

    ReplyDelete
  6. I flew into LAX 49 years ago, so I'm not really sure what real-time Brit pronunciation is. So I was pleased to hear it's still PER-sil!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I couldn't agree more. Americans do tend to put the emPHAsis on the wrong sylLABle

    I have to admit that I DO prefer V-eye-tamin over vitamin (as in bit) and the latest one that gets me is innovative ... even in England they innovate sometimes even with a long o ... but the English pronunciation innuvativ really bugs me.

    ReplyDelete
  8. The law of the consuhvation of ahhs (conservation of r's) while predominant in the north east of the US is quite annoying.

    Take r's from some words ... particularly the ends ... and stick them in the middle somewhere so you end up with such wonderful things like Warshing machines ... and chests of draws

    ReplyDelete